Jan

6

Raw Food Diet: Dairy Free Cheese Options

For many of us, cheese is a cherished comfort food.  However, there is an increasing amount of evidence that dairy products can result in serious health conditions ranging from allergies to cancer.  Cheese is certainly tasty, but how good is it for your health?

Eliminating dairy from your diet is an effective way to increase your energy and boost your zest for life!  It will also decrease your health care costs in the long run.  There’s a great Youtube series of 8 videos called Udderly Amazing that gives very nice explanations of why cow’s milk is not a good food for humans.  Video 2 explains why drinking milk of any species after weaning is a bad idea.

Here’s the first two in the series:

Making the shift away from milk is not that difficult for many people.  There is such a wide variety of milk substitutes to choose from.  Typically, when you enter a grocery store, there will be almond milk, soy milk, rice milk, hemp milk, and sometimes even coconut milk on the shelf.  There are sweetened and unsweetened options and some milks come in different flavors.

If you would rather try to avoid the processed milk substitutes at the grocery store, you can make always make one yourself.  It is a fairly easy process to do at home.  You just need the right tools.  Basically, a nut milk bag and a blender is all you need.  You’d be surprised at how simple it really is.

Good cheese substitutes are harder to find.  Most of the available cheese substitutes are not even really dairy-free.  Nearly all of them are soy-based and contain casein.  Casein is a protein extracted from cow’s milk.  The video series above explains all about casein.  It is the most common cause of dairy allergy symptoms.  So, it seems like it would defeat the purpose to make a cheese substitute with casein in it.  There are a few almond or rice based cheese substitutes, but they’re all highly processed and they include iffy ingredients like canola oil.

Locating a healthy and nourishing cheese substitute was a nightmare, until now!  You can make your own cheese substitute right in your home kitchen!  Your dairy-free cheese substitute comes complete with probiotics to boost your digestive system and other nutrient dense ingredients that will promote health and energy.

You can enjoy substitute cheese in any shape or form.  Make it solid, slice it, make it into a sauce, spread it on vegetables.  Do whatever you like with it!  You can make creamy, sharp, or tangy cheese!  Make whatever suits you!  You can enjoy the cheesy taste that we all know and love while strengthening your immune system at the same time!

Our cheeses are comprised of raw nuts and seeds, probiotics, some lemon juice, seasonings and binders like Irish moss and psyllium husk.  They are delicious and nutritious additions to any diet.

We’ll be teaching our secret cheese making techniques on January 16.  The live class is in Austin, Texas and it will also be broadcast over the internet and available on digital video afterward.  Learn our secret recipes for soft ricotta like cheese (we use it to make ravioli), cheese ball rolled in nuts,white and cheddar cheese blocks, macadamia nut feta cheese, swiss cheese slices and a beautiful party spread made with a white cheese layered with pesto and sun dried tomatoes.

These cheeses are amazing.  Karen Osborne gifted me with two types of cheese for Christmas.  One was a spreadable block, the other was firm enough to cut into slices.  I enjoyed both  on chia crackers, topped with sunflower sprouts!

It’s such a great feeling to enjoy the tangy creaminess of cheese, knowing it’s so nutritious.  What a delicious way to replenish your gut with probiotics.

We look forward to a very good turnout for this class.  If you have a conflict or live far away, please join us for the webcast  and videos.

Click HERE to Register for Cheeses – No Dairy, No Guilt, 100% Raw and Living Foods


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Category: Living Foods, Raw Foods classes

About the Author ()

Dr. Ritamarie Loscalzo is a Doctor of Chiropractic with Certification in Acupuncture, a Diplomat of the American Clinical Nutrition Board, a Certified Clinical Nutritionist, a licensed HeartMath® provider, is certified in Herbal Medicine. Dr. Ritamarie holds Masters Degrees in Nutrition and Computer Science and is certified as a living foods chef, instructor, coach and teacher. Dr. Ritamarie has over 20 years of experience counseling people in the area of nutrition, with particular emphasis on raw and living foods.

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